Call me by my True Names

I love this poem from Thich Nhat Hanh

Look deeply: I arrive in every second
to be a bud on a spring branch
to be a tiny bird, with wings still fragile, learning to sing in my new nest,
to be a caterpillar in the heart of a flower,
to be a jewel hiding itself in a stone.

I still arrive, in order to laugh and to cry, in order to fear and to hope,
the rhythm of my heart is the birth and death of all that is alive….

I am the 12-year-old girl, refugee on a small boat,
who throws herself into the ocean after being raped by a sea pirate,
and I am the pirate, my heart not yet capable of seeing and loving….

Please call me by my true names, so I can wake up
and so the door of my heart can be left open,
the door of compassion.[9]

Life comes to us as a great, eternal calling….

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Life comes to us as a great, eternal calling, reaching out to us, unfolding around and inside of us, while at the same time holding us, in our entirety,from the unnamable past to the unknowable future. Life’s eternal truth is our truth, just as surely as our temporal clinging and attachment to the dance of self and ego is our truth. The Buddha’s teaching emanates from deep insight into the unending mix of pain and promise that is human life. Buddha sees what we cannot see, sees that we cannot see, and out of unfathomable concern for our well being, calls out to all humankind with the equally unfathomable message of our liberation from self-imposed restrictions, anxieties and turmoil. The Nembutsu tradition, more broadly known as Pure Land Buddhism, understands the whole of the Buddhist teaching and its history as Buddha’s entreaty, Buddha’s call to us to awaken to this eternal promise, a call carried by the compassionate movement that is life itself.

– Jerry Bolick

The Path of Foolish Beings

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Here is a great article in the magazine Buddhadahrma about the Shin Buddhist path.   Who are the foolish beings? According to the Shin tradition of Pure Land Buddhism, we all are. Mark Unno explains that only by becoming aware of our limited self and acknowledging our fundamental foolishness can we realize the oneness of all beings and the limitless flow of compassion.

One of the implications of the Mahayana Buddhist idea of emptiness is that the important question is not “What does it mean to be a  buddhist?” It is “What does it means to be a human being?” That’s because emptiness applies to Buddhism itself as much as it does to ordinary objects of attachment. It is only when one has been “emptied” of all preconceived categories, including those of Buddhism, that the deepest reality of being human becomes apparent. As the Zen master Dogen states, “To study the buddhadharma is to study the self. To study the self
is to forget the self.”

Read More….

 

Come As You Are.

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Sunday Morning Gatherings

are open for guests and members from 09:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m

Vitalize Community Studio

2154 S. Highland Drive | North Entrance
Salt lake City, UT 84106

For Information Call 801-502-8130

Beginner and advanced practitioners.

All are welcomed.

The Salt Lake City Buddhist Fellowship serves the greater Salt Lake City region. We are an independent community affiliated the North American Shin Buddhist Association. Our Practice Leader is Mr. Christopher Leibow.

Our community wishes to deeply explore into our hearts and minds to unfold true entrusting in the Oneness of Reality, symbolized as Amida Buddha. In order to deepen our appreciation, knowledge and experience of the Mahayana Buddhist teachings and practices, we use readings from various Buddhist books and multimedia.

In addition, we recognize the importance of practice, therefore, at the beginning of our gatherings we Go for Refuge in the Three Jewels, do inspirational prayers and conduct sacred chants using the Om Mani Padme Hum and Juseige chants, and afterwards we have a brief zazen (quiet sitting). Even though our studies emphasize the Buddhist teachings and practices, we are open to the entirety of world spirituality.

Our gatherings include quiet sitting and voice meditation, plenty of discussion, fellowship and refreshments. The Buddhist Friends want you to know that you are invited to join them in practice.